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  1. This one had got little to do with machines, sorry but it's part of the history! 😉 As well as running the Customer Service team I was eventually asked to run the Spares Sales department which was recovering after an unsuccessful attempt at trying to stock other manufacturers spares for the industry, a sort of “Radio Spares” for the industry. This meant I had to get to grips with stock holdings, more budgets, stock takes and bin cards but while I was there though I became more aware of the Ferranti computer which was a dirty great Main Frame computer that ran the rest of the company and which we in Customer Service knew very little about. We had to put our figures in via data entry clerks specialists. Looking back now it seems farcical, but let’s not forget that at the time Fax hadn’t made its way to the office yet, we were still using telex and TNT had only just started delivering parcels! Jack wanted to bring the place up to date and install a much smaller but much more powerful machine from IBM but was concerned that the change over would be a bit of a nightmare. The decision was taken by the board that the trial would be made by installing a system 36 as a test bed, more for the company than for IBM obviously, and he decided that the trial would be under my wing. Bird ha ha! Spares Sales was chosen as it was the smaller of the stores and so I was banged off on a course in Bracknell where I was exposed to the programming language and the various process’s involved. When the trial was over I could start helping others understand when the larger system was installed. I think it was system 38? The installation went ahead and within a week we had our stock levels in and were running the two systems in tandem, the same numbers being entered into both machines by ourselves and the data entry clerks, these were then tallied against the stock at the end of each month. Problem was the figures never tallied. Try as we might we could not get our stock figures to match up with those that were in the main frame and this was a complete mystery. We had a consignment of stock delivered from the main stores, we stocked it, sold it, dispatched it and logged every single transaction. The ensuing figures were often way out for too many items to be comfortable, so exhibiting less trust than perhaps I should have, I worked for a month with the team watching as many transactions as I could and cross checking data entries. After a long period of head scratching and considering all the variables we eventually came to the simple conclusion that the only figure over which we had no control was the item count of the incoming goods. So when the next delivery came from the main stores I took the film wrapped cases, opened them and counted them in rather than taking the quantity on face value. Many of them were wrong! The clouds cleared. Light Bulb moment! For my incoming stock to be wrong the main stores levels should in reality also be similarly incorrect? As some quantities were actually greater than they should have been that would mean that the corresponding items in the main stores should have been short? Yet their figures and stock levels were constantly correct so throwing bad light on our efforts and therefore reinforcing the effort to keep the Ferranti and the status quo. It was obvious to me that they were passing stock errors, shortages, and who knows what else, on to us and then casting aspersions our way, but who to tell? I decided that the only person to tell was Jack Jones as I didn’t know who to trust, that sounds a little conspiratorial but in truth there was a managerial clique, as there often is in business, and as the Customer’s representative I found I quite often didn’t fit, but then you knew that already? My goals were a little different to theirs although they should have been the same. I called Jack over and prayed that the items we were about to open would give credence to my claims. A pack of expensive TMS 9980 Micro Processors straight from the stores were first opened, we checked the quantity against the stock sheet we had been given, it was short. Eproms, worth a few quid each, 40 too many, transistors at pennies each, hundreds too many and so it went on. The only thing to do now was to wait for the next stock check in the main stores which came in and was apparently correct. Even with the irregularities in our transfers, really? After a few weeks the obvious and very visible shortages in the stores were several of the stores staff and a data entry clerk who also failed to make an appearance. Quite what was happening I never found out, but the Ferranti was changed and the System 38 was put in. On another point, having had experience of the IBM and the Ferranti and being exposed to personal computers, I began to consider the common ground between them. But this was not my ‘job’ it was just an interest, and currently my ‘job’ was Customer Service and Spares Sales. But not for much longer……..
    9 points
  2. I have to agree with BF74 and point out that we often had to change pay-out structures during mid production run as it were. Glasses and perhaps bands were ordered and heads were banged on tables trying to figure out how was the easiest way to accommodate the new pay-out not only artwork etc but for the engineer on site. In this instance the little grey cells of BF74 were spot on and the 5 pulse cam was used to drop 2x10 coins, which was never truly optimal as if the switch dwell was slightly too small ( the dwell was what we called the width of the cut out in the cam ) if it were too small the slide would snap back, return too quickly and then clobber a token making it stick in the jaws. By the way Riche100 was kind enough to supply me with a WINNER schematic which I had been after for years and there on the bottom and due to a law change was a new pay-out relay and associated circuit on the schematic, with my handwriting! Now prized possession and framed on the wall !
    9 points
  3. 1980-82? After Sales was a great place to work and was somewhere that I found I really had a penchant for, and really enjoyed. I mean people had problems. You fixed them cause you could. They were happy, your employer was happy, what was there not to like. Well for a start several of the 'old school’ team. Although they were in their positions they did not do the job properly, as I saw it, and I worked hard at doing the job right. As I have said I was eventually given the job of After Sales Manager so I guess I was right? I mean as a lowly engineer rep I was given 3 patches, North of Hadrian’s Wall, South of the M4 and anything to the right of Cambridge. This meant that all the large city centres with their easily available night life attractions were retained by my superiors! Let’s not go there! My main team consisted of Anne Marie O Sullivan, Julia Lockwood, Martyn Stork, Hugh Thomas, Russell Grimble, David Mead, then later Steve Bryant, Simon McCarthy and Adrian Davies. Although others joined us it was us that kicked off my new “Customer Service” department. I didn’t like the handle ‘After Sales’, it smacked more of the ‘companies toilet paper’ rather than an aide to the customer which is how I saw it As I figured it we were there to represent the customer during and After Sales, and in fact if we could get to them Pre sales we might persuade them to be a customer by explaining the finer points of the product!’ At that time we were still preparing service manuals the old fashioned way and when I use the term ‘cut and paste’, I literally mean it. Cutting sections from an old printed manual and pasting them onto a new sheet that had the new bits already typed in but with spaces for the old text. This was then set off to be reproduced by some witchcraft of which I knew very little but I think it involved photography of some description! Plus of course the Technical Service Bulletins or TSB’s had to be produced when we had an issue or wanted Customers to know about information like conversion kits and law changes or other important information. Addressing envelopes individually from address books was daunting and although we did look at memory golf ball typewriters, I got to hear of the new personal computers that were becoming available so I approached Jack and he agreed to at least listen to my suggestions and so off I went. I spoke to Dave Young who had his own Marketing company and spent a great deal of time with us and who I had a hell of a lot of time for and in fact became a friend and another mentor. Dave was the ‘T shirt’ guru by the way, it was he that suggested we should include them in the cash box for that period! He put me in touch with a fledgling company in Swansea where I went to see the machinery that I had only heard of, bearing in mind this was pre 1980. The machine was an 8080, CPM based, twin 8.5” 128k floppy disk system with a golf ball printer and monitor. The metal box itself, yes the huge blue powder coated steel box was about 600mm x 600mm by 350mm high or about as big as a small kitchen wall unit. It ran Wordstar and Supercalc (like we knew what the hell a spread sheet was!) but Anne Marie and Julia and I stuck to it and we were soon getting things done so much quicker. Anyway given today’s knowledge you will know that cut and paste is a completely different issue Ctrl C - Ctrl V, no mouse! Mail shots were now the push of a button (well several combinations of buttons actually). Friday afternoon’s were taken up creating backups from the master disk to back up discs. PIP A:=B:*.* (god where did that come from) Then on the screen TRWV. TRWV TRWV (Track Read Write Verify) And so on for ages….and ages. Customers address’s were stored and easily reproduced on adhesive backed labels to be stuck on envelopes which became superseded eventually by fan fold envelopes no less. These were shot out and were stuffed with ‘personalised’ mails by the team in periods of fraternal and frantic office origami, not just the secretarial staff. Engineers were expected to join in but then the girls helped with unpacking returns and occasional de-soldering and checking test routines prepared by the engineers. One big happy team multi functional team. So successful was the introduction of the machine that other departments became interested, especially as we had soon invested in an MPM or multi user system. This allowed the guys to have terminals and access manuals and low level, Technical tip ‘batch files’ that I created for them to look at. The JPM Sales administration team and the R+D specification team soon had their own MPM machines and I was seconded to Sales for a few months to learn relational Data base structures to create Invoices etc for the Sales department. This was no doubt as Anne Marie had left Customer Service for Sales and taken our forward thinking ethos with her, but thank God I still had Julia. To be continued......
    8 points
  4. Welcome to the world of frustrating MPU3 faults. A few things you need to check, the 500HZ osc from the 555. Both the 10K timing and duty cycle resistors can go out of limits as can the big 0.1uF cap. Do IC9 and IC24 show any signs of the green plague on their legs, if so replace them (in sockets). The RAM sockets can be an issue as they are the 'stamped' type but due to the fact you have the daughterboard you can't fit the more reliable 'turned' ones. Sometimes contact cleaner will work but again any signs of the green stuff, whip em out! Don't forget to clean the legs of the daughterboard too and check the state of the actual RAM chip socket. The ROM cart socket can give you grief too if it's dirty or lost tension on the pins. A bit of contact cleaner and a very fine (and I mean 'very') emery board works wonders. Also if the little silver key spacer is broken (very common) the cart can just be out of alignment enough to stop it booting or at least become intermittent. See how you get on with that.....
    5 points
  5. An interesting point of which only the present or new owner will be able to accurately answer and possibly the reason the machine has been spared of being converted to all cash. As it was originally manufacture as a 50p token max payout machine, JPM will have fitted only a 5 pulse payout cam as it pays 10p tokens as well as 10p cash. For this later £1 token model it would need a 10 pulse cam OR the easy option was to fit a 2x10p token payslide which is my thoughts. If this is the setting then the same original 5 pulse cam could be left as is and for the £1 tokens 5 pulses of a 2x token slide is all that's needed. As the 10p slide is only a single 1x 10p slide, wiring the token payout slide over to the cash payout slide is not an option and the £1 would only payout 50p cash. Just dragged my Housey Housey schematic out to see which version it is and it's the modified £1 drawing so, I can confirm it is indeed fitted with a 2x 10p token payslide.
    4 points
  6. My favourite was save your money for driving lessons 🤣
    3 points
  7. You came back to a light hearted one year old thread to tell us you are a socialist and you want to bring back BT and British gas LMAO.
    3 points
  8. Let's keep politics out of it, please? I come here to avoid shite like that.
    3 points
  9. PCP - Moneyline & Loony BinTech: MPU3Here's 2 identical machines with 1 slight difference, the reel feature on Loony bin you stop the centre reel for a chance of a 2 or 3 of a kind win, and on Moneyline it's the left reel for a 2 of a kind win or sometimes a 3 of a kind win.Keyboard shortcuts in the notes.Thanks toWizard (RIP) for MFME@Amot for the Moneyline Roms & ImagesThe Loony Bin rom provider@riche100 for the Loony Bin flyer@AK45 for testing.Plays in MFME V20.1 only. Money Line.zip Loony Bin.zip
    3 points
  10. PCP - Cashino DeluxeTech: MPU4Fancy a trip to the cashino, and maybe have a game of roulette or have a go on the slots? then try this game out.It's a little confusing at first, being dual stake at 2.5p or 5p play and a jackpot of either £1 or £6.Keyboard shortcuts in the notes.Thanks to:Wizard (RIP) for MFME@riche100 for the flyerThe rom provider.Use MFME V20.1 only. Cashino Deluxe.zip
    3 points
  11. I already have a couple of working mpu3 machines but no experience of fixing anything inside the metal box. I decided to have a go at building some experience so I’d have the confidence to try and fix any issues that might arise with my working machines. I purchased a non-working Royal Exchange and didn’t pay a lot for it but reasoned with myself that if my project failed then I could always sell it on or break it for spares. But I only want to preserve it and get it working!! I have no contacts to call on for help, but I’ve found this forum is a brilliant resource for people like myself who are willing to have a go. I’ve been logging everything I’ve done so the following posts detail my journey so far. The story so far part 1… Power on and Royal Exchange not working, only 2/3 flo tubes lit. I replaced the ST111 starters and all the flo tubes, then checked/replaced all the PSU fuses. The mpu3 board is a Mod 5 with a daughter board and 6117 RAM. No battery on the board but it was evident the old battery had leaked and done some damage as there is some masking missing. Someone has previously cleaned the board up, but upon first inspection I found quite a few green legged components, also T60 had a broken leg and C41 was missing. I replaced T60, T61, C41 and R92 – R95. I also cleaned between tracks with a fibre pencil and mopped up with IPA. Checking the white power plug I found that the 12v return pins 1 & 9 had burnt. I then fitted a bypass lead to 0v on the board as suggested elsewhere on this forum. I checked pin voltages on the white power plug and all OK. I fly wired a NiMh battery, confirmed 5v at the link and pin 24 on 6117 which dropped to 2.4v on power off. After cleaning all the plugs I connected the board and switched on… it booted but was stuck in reset. Reels stepped up & down and remained stiff, optos lit and display was now showing ‘Resetting RE 4.0’.
    3 points
  12. Thanks again Bob. I’ve rebuilt the Reset Circuit again this afternoon, and also put T59 and R79 back in. Upon testing I’m getting garbled or no text on the display, and the voltage at the R76/T57 junction climbs quickly to 14.86v at switch on. I am getting 5.26v almost instantly on the RESET line. I’ve spent time this evening mapping out voltage readings to 0v at various points within the Reset Circuit as per the attached pic. I’m just hoping this may highlight something to your experienced eye? After this I logic probed the RAM chips again and they gave the same outputs as when the board was running. RAM voltages are a solid 4.98v. Cheers, Steve.
    3 points
  13. Does the RESET circuit function correctly, sounds like it doesn't? It should go to approx 0v on switch on and then after about a second switch to 5v. You shouldn't need to 'jump' the RESET obviously but I would make sure that part is all working first as it will save you time. Depending what mod state you have will depend on what parts may be faulty. Moving on to the no boot is where it can get tricky. Assuming your ROM chip is OK, test by substitution, then you are getting in to logic probe or even scope territory. I wouldn't recommend a scatter gun approach either of swapping all the support chips (unless things get desperate, been there a few times) as that can lead to all sorts of added problems of pad lifting, broken vias etc unless you have all the right gear of course. It'll be a good idea to do IC9 & 24 anyway as you may hit lucky. Watch you don't pull any pads off though as some of the pins are soldered both sides
    3 points
  14. At JPM we once had a lorry turn up from Ireland that had delivered frozen goods to a local establishment and had been paid to pick up machines for the return journey. The lorries compressor unit was stuck on, so the the thing was like a huge fridge and the guys loading the lorry with sack trucks soon had coats on, although as the machine were in those huge plastic bags no one was unduly worried. Unfortunately the contraction coefficient of solder is much different to the relay base metal tags so the vast majority of them fell off and even those that didn't were suspect. The relay base has 11 soldered connections as I remember and the club machine had 20+ relays and there were 40 machines delivered. That's somewhere near 9,000 questionable connections! It took us days to solder the bloody things back on, but at least the Guinness and craic were good. Ha just remembered another funny incident. Martin Stork and I were in Ireland and we were working on a couple of machines, don't forget this is in the 80's. We were modifying product and terminating cables using 'bomb ends'. https://www.rivval.com/Product.aspx?p=RP00454/1 The look on peoples faces when I shouted to Martin to chuck me a couple of bombs!
    3 points
  15. or you could just leave magik alone and be patient ?
    2 points
  16. I'm taking a crack at this nice Bally EM "Las Vegas". Around 15 years ago I had a collection of about 8 or 9 Bally EM machines including some rare ones but gradually sold them off. This Ebay one is a rarity, date is either 1968 or 1975, documentation is scarce and muddled on all their models. This model was made by Bally in the US for export only to Sweden, Denmark and Australia. As this has the reel glass in English it must have come up from Australia at some time in the last half century. It's in nice condition (chrome needs some TLC on the belly glass surround) but I have a feeling this might go over my budget.... https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/154703760226?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2055359.m1431.l2648
    2 points
  17. Yes electro mechanical, think I might have that schematic too Rich.
    2 points
  18. Hmm, that means the via has been ripped out when the original transistor was removed, unless it's rotted of course!
    2 points
  19. Here's the manual Dave. astra ready to roll.pdf
    2 points
  20. Thanks Bob, yes I see what you mean. Due to working I’m unable to have a proper look at this until the end of next week, but I couldn’t resist doing a bit of continuity testing tonight. All the transistors meter OK on the diode test. The T59 and T58 emitters have continuity as expected, the soldering is OK and they link via a single track on the underside of the board. Crucially, what I did find is the solder joint on the top side of the board for the T59 emitter does not have continuity to the 0v track!! So I’m keeping my fingers crossed that fixing this will give me a result 😐
    2 points
  21. 2 points
  22. OK, why is there 5.27v on the emitter of T58, it should be at 0v?
    2 points
  23. No, it should start at 0v and then switch to 5v after approx 1 second ish. No point keep changing the transistors as it's unlikely they are bad again. Looking back through the thread I see you had removed the spark circuit so that's eliminated. The timing of the RESET pulse is set by R76 and C36 which you can monitor by reading the voltage from R76/T57 to ground on switch on. It should start at a low voltage and rise to somewhere 12-15v if I remember. If that's happening then T57 should be switching when it's collector voltage reaches the threshold of the 9v1 zener on it's emitter which in turn switches T58 on and T59 off....bingo 5v on the RESET line.
    2 points
  24. Barcrest - Bank A Note Tech: MPU4 See how much you can bank with this game from Barcrest. It's a straight clone of Action Note. Keyboard shortcuts in the notes. Thanks to: Wizard (RIP) for MFME Bugs & @Geddyfor their classic The rom & image providers. Plays in MFME V20.1 only. Bank A Note.zip
    2 points
  25. this should help - note the notches on the proms
    2 points
  26. 2 points
  27. I know your sorted but this was a frog it.. Might help
    2 points
  28. Many thanks for the pointers Bob. I have only previously ‘tickled’ the ROM socket connections with a fibre pencil and sprayed with contact cleaner so I will try your emery board suggestion. The key spacer appears to be ok on inspection. I don’t have access to a scope to measure the 555 so I will order a replacement 555, along with replacements for C33 and C34 which I also don’t have. What I can replace today is R67 - R69 and C32. The pins on IC9 & IC24 don’t have any green legs. I will give all the pins and all that area a good clean up anyway, and the same for the daughterboard. I do have replacements and turned pin sockets ready to fit for IC9 & IC24 so if there’s no improvement after replacing everything in the 555 circuit I will try that next. The only reason I haven’t done this already is that I’m unsure about soldering the turned pin sockets as I noticed a few of the pins also need soldering on top of the board. I will do a bit of research on that!
    2 points
  29. Honestly can't remember, sorry! I know this is going to sound strange but I was never interested in the games themselves, just the figures they produced, the mechanisms within them and the design process.
    2 points
  30. Just spotted this on eBay and only a two day auction, now I’m no electro collector but this looks like a BEAUTY if I was 👍 and with MR Birds great stories recently quite topical 😁 https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Old-Fruit-Machine-/313734138187?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&_trksid=p2349624.m46890.l49286&mkrid=710-127635-2958-0
    2 points
  31. Here is mine , still on old £1 but working fine
    2 points
  32. Yeah, still got it. Now with DIY reel window illumination and replacement tower light!
    2 points
  33. That lead free solder can go straight in the bin.
    2 points
  34. Looks very nice tbh.
    2 points
  35. The payouts are not all tokens, just the £1 is tokens and the rest up to 50p is cash. !0p for each line lit but A full bingo card gives 50p cash. This one still looks in original condition with it's 10p and token tube intact which is rare to see these days. The two hoover tubes to cash box are for the big 5p and 50p coins. Just to add this is a later version on £1 as the released version was 20p cash 50p tokens, but still an original JPM build not someone's conversion. Like many other manufacturers in that era, the payout's changed on the time of release of many models.
    2 points
  36. I've used one of these daily for 3-4 years and have done all my repairs so far with it...🙂 I've used the same mullered tip for about 18months because it holds a perfect 'drip' of solder on in the end for track repairs 😂 tried loads of different ones but it's perfect for what I do. That said I'm going to get an iron for my Pace station and gear which I'm slowly investing in within the next year. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Holife-SOLDERING-IRON-STATION-Temperature-Adjustable-Rapid-Heating-Bracket-Kit-/194353530609?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&_trksid=p2349624.m46890.l49286&mkrid=710-127635-2958-0 Added a picture-it's cheap, not pretty and had a lot of use... It's the Katie Price of soldering irons 😎 does the job though
    2 points
  37. https://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/soldering-stations/4691076 I've got one of these, not cheap but a great piece of kit. Get your wallet out you tight cunt!
    2 points
  38. Hi, fixed it myself. The error was in the switch matrix. Replacing U13 4051B and U12 74LS06 (both now on machine sockets) and fixed broken connections to P11. Works fine.
    2 points
  39. similar machine here too .. thanks cloe
    2 points
  40. 1 point
  41. here's the full sets for the game Cops 'n' Robbers Club Platinum (Bellfruit) [c] [Rom].7z
    1 point
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