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JPM, my view from the inside. Frank Bird.


Frank Bird
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  • 1 year later...


thought I’d bump this as I’ve just come across this on the net.

 

https://segaretro.org/JPM_International#Softography

 

It says JPM was sold to whitbread in 1988 i always thought the original owners sold out to SEGA in the mid 90s.

 

ive always thought JPM started to lose the plot around the late 80s and this probably explains why that was.
 

 

 

if frank ever returns it will be a good read to see what changes they made(good and bad)

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  • 1 month later...
On 9/28/2020 at 4:03 AM, Road Runner said:


thought I’d bump this as I’ve just come across this on the net.

 

https://segaretro.org/JPM_International#Softography

 

It says JPM was sold to whitbread in 1988 i always thought the original owners sold out to SEGA in the mid 90s.

 

ive always thought JPM started to lose the plot around the late 80s and this probably explains why that was.
 

 

 

if frank ever returns it will be a good read to see what changes they made(good and bad)

I was there through all this. Whitbread buying the company was the death knell for us. They ran the business into the ground and it was later purchased by the then cfo. Who later sold it to Sega. 

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18 minutes ago, Arkon said:

I was there through all this. Whitbread buying the company was the death knell for us. They ran the business into the ground and it was later purchased by the then cfo. Who later sold it to Sega. 

Do you have any stories for us please 

So nice to see you here 

 

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1 hour ago, Arkon said:

I was there through all this. Whitbread buying the company was the death knell for us. They ran the business into the ground and it was later purchased by the then cfo. Who later sold it to Sega. 


ive seen these type of takeovers in my professional life.

 

i can just see JPM with R&D budget cuts, rehashing loads of ideas, tight schedules, quantity before quality and all the good staff leaving within 18 months.

 

results = it’s JPM in name only.

 

 

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  • 2 months later...
  • 3 weeks later...

A friend of franks and co worker has just told me that jpm had there own inhouse magazine 

i wonder what interesting stuff it has inside, i am hoping we will hear from frank and his co worker on the mecca again , if not and i am sent anything i will share it here 

its so awesome ... got me fingers crossed 

 

 

jpmcompanymagazine.jpg

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17 hours ago, riche100 said:

A friend of franks and co worker has just told me that jpm had there own inhouse magazine 

i wonder what interesting stuff it has inside, i am hoping we will hear from frank and his co worker on the mecca again , if not and i am sent anything i will share it here 

its so awesome ... got me fingers crossed 

 

 

jpmcompanymagazine.jpg

Nice one Del

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i am hoping franks friend joins the mecca and shares his experience of the industry , if not i am hoping he lets me have access to whats in some of his folders/files so i can share them with you 

 

if anything atall happens i will let you know . 

 

nothing will be shared without consent .i'm afraid

 

lets all keep our fingers crossed .  

 

 

151330999_441828090299254_978254827930396110_n.jpg

151608464_428509465127234_7970572692590879885_n.png

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  • 1 month later...
  • 4 months later...
1 hour ago, Frank Bird said:

Apologies..

Been a strange couple of years hasn't it?

I have some more to add ( at last ) for anyone interested - let me catch up what I have done before.

   

 

Yes please!

If you have anything specific on the SWPs like Give Us A Break, I know there's a few big fans of those machines on this forum.

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1 hour ago, CanonMan said:

Yes please!

If you have anything specific on the SWPs like Give Us A Break, I know there's a few big fans of those machines on this forum.

Hi there, happy to be back. I was (eventually) the project manager for the SWP Product and that will certainly be mentioned in time, I am trying to be as historically correct as I can.

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I have to explain first of all what brought me back to this forum.

During a long lunchtime exercise walk around the ex WWII aircraft hangers in Llandow, my colleague picked something up from the grass verge... would you believe it!

image.thumb.png.c548c85cd1a5a0a2bb83f28700051514.png

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Can I just say again that these notes are taken from my perspective so I am bound to figure large in them.  If this seems self indulgent or self promoting it's not meant to be so be honest, re-direct me if I drift off subject.


The appeal of Development and creating new ideas and (truth is) actually being “recognised” for my abilities was beginning to appeal to me.

It was here where I learnt how to create, wire and programme the analogue computer (for that was what it was) from the schematics prepared by Alan and Howard Parker.

I never knew what a schematic was and the consideration that it bore no resemblance to the actual physical layout took a while to get my head around. 

As by way of explanation consider the London underground schematic is not geographical and gives no idea of the distance between two points!

Constructing them as we did with a hole cutter, a plastic tray, a rivet gun, a soldering Iron  and several rows of SAIA or Starpoint (more of them later) rotary switch timers, dozens of Omron relays and yards and yards of tri coloured wire.

Bad Boys Race Our Young Girls But Violet Generally Wins

Oh my lord where did that come from…. 

Black, Brown, Red, Orange, Yellow, Green Blue,Violet,Grey, White

Isn’t memory a strange thing, I can forget anniversaries but that came from no where?

Anyway, I digress (sounds Welsh?)

Working for the first time with Alan and Howard and Ron (Watts) I learned how the machine was wired and constructed.

I was also introduced into the world of ‘programming’ as indeed that was what it was, sequencing the operation of the timers and cams so that the various components operated in time during the game cycle.

As a simple example the reel motor had to start momentarily before the reel stop solenoids were lifted or the reels would not start quickly and together.

Oooh if I remember it was 10 degrees before, now where did that come from!

All these little ‘sub routines’ would be recognised for what they were many years later with the introduction of the computer programme, perhaps it was around even then I don’t know.

Furthermore I was also exposed to statistics, probability, chance, randomness and game structure and I eagerly started to read about them and found them fascinating.

Although basic calculations could be worked out and a free running machine could be constructed to record the wins on meters without a player, believe it or not, the only way a machine was percentage tested was by sitting there with a black coffee (Nescafe) and a fag (Marlboro).

Playing the machine over and over again and trying to get maximum return from the benefits offered via holds and features was second nature after a while, all the time recording on sheets of A4 paper the result of each game and what you had done to influence it with hold or hold after win etc.

Example….

6421 Gr | Gr | Or |.......|......|.......|
6422 Gr | Gr | Gr | H1 | H2 |.......| 20p | H
6423 Gr | Gr | Gr | H1 | H2 | H3 | 40p | HAW
 
And so on. 

By the way I guess the payout amount is wrong but you get the idea hopefully, and the big number? 

That is the game number and until you got to around 5-6 thousand the results, apparently, were not very revealing unless they were really crazy by which time you knew there was something wrong with the design.

With a 3 reel machine and 20 symbols per reel the full game cycle was 8000 games and until that number was achieved we sat there and played - and played.

This was the boring bit but it helped that I had a colleague to share banter with and Charles Hazel or Bingham, was that man.

One episode that was amusing was brought about while checking the percentage of a machine and realising that I had not recognised a 'Grape' win, or three grapes appearing in the win line.

This was about 40p or some small amount and this appeared to be bringing the percentage payout down and certainly should have appeared more often than it had appeared to have done.

I checked the spec and the glass and and there was the win symbol but looking at the third reel there were no grapes and the wiring had not accommodated the win either. 

It had been missed out of the design.

I wont mention the guys name but he did go red from embarrassment! 

I mean 'what' are the chances eh?

I found that I was really happy in the development arena.

I began to notice that the later endeavours from the research area incorporated electronics, micro processors and plug in circuit boards some of which could be seen in the ‘extra secret’ development area.

Plug in sub boards could be seen on a back plane and discrete components such as transistors and capacitors could also be recognised none of which I knew of at the time.

So I decided it was time to get some serious studying done and I enrolled in Llandaff technical college for a course in Micro Processor Controllers and Electronic Circuitry and turned up in my Vauxhall viva HA ( to give a time reference).

I was not alone as several of my colleagues decided that this was the way to go so we used to got to college and this was an excuse for another night out!

Working with industrial research and development teams and being exposed to ‘cutting edge’ technology of it’s time meant that much of the stuff we were exposed to was ahead of the college’s mediocre supplies.

I began taking orders and quite often delivered components, circuits and odd parts in to donate to the tutors which they were grateful for and helped me to become friendly with the tutors. 

All this was sanctioned by the company as it gave us an ‘in’ to the University.

As an aside here it was during this period of development that we were working closely with Texas Instruments and as we were about to take a great deal of their products, particularly the TI 9980.

This was to be the heart of the new system I was told.

Anyway, one of their consultants came to work alongside us to help with the interface.

The guys name was Peter Crow.

I can remember some years later the hilarity caused as a receptionist in a hotel took down the names of myself and my colleagues.

Martyn Stork, Frank Bird, Peter Crow and Ian Wingfield when we all booked into a hotel for the night.

Cheeky girl laughed and her name was Abigail.

Part of the development of the Electronic system for JPM was the adoption of a cutting edge drive for the reel unit, those spinning wheels that display the recognised symbols such as Oranges Grapes and Lemons etc.

Again as an aside here, many people are unaware that the symbols or Icons of fruits, are actually supposed to be a hangover from the early days of coin operated machine in the US. 

Or at least this is what I have heard from many people both in this country and the states and it is the subject of much conjecture.

Most people (well those not on this forum anyway) probably don't know where the term ‘fruit machine’ came from. 

The modern day ‘fruit machine’ is actually supposed to be a result of several American companies around at that time one of which was called Bell and they produced chewing gum, or so the story goes. 

They developed a machine along with the Mills company (again so the story goes) that dispensed the ‘Bell’ fruit flavoured chewing gum and sold them in early coin operated machines that used the reels as a gimmick. 

The game would play and the customer would get delivered a fruit flavoured gum! 

The ‘Bar’ symbol is again, supposed to be, a representation of a stick of chewing gum and the Bell symbol, well that goes without saying.

Of course the typical bar owner would always have a little ‘book’ on the side and you could give the guy a dollar or two and bet him that you would win your stick of gum.

If you did he would give you back a prize whose value was based on an arbitrary amount depending on the fruits that came up or perhaps the Bell or the Bar symbol would have been the top prize and gave perhaps 10 to 1 on your stake.

Of course the odds were heavily in favour of the Bar (for Bar read Mob, of course).

In any case enough of ancient history, the next step (sic) is into the future with the Stepper Reel unit!

Edited by Frank Bird
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